White Castle

White Castle is one of three castles, along with Grosmont and Skenfrith, that became part of the aptly named “Three Castles” lordship. This designation came about as part of the Norman conqueror’s attempt to ensure their control of the borderlands between Wales and England, particularly the road to Hereford. The castle was commissioned initially by William Fitz Osbern, the first Lord of Hereford, when it consisted of earthworks with timber defenses. After the wars with Wales starting in 1135, King Stephen consolidated the control of these three castles into a single lordship and had them rebuilt in stone. Control of the castle went back and forth between several owners, among them the powerful Burgh and Braose families, depending on the whims of whoever was king at the time. Hubert de Burgh, in particular, fell out with royal authority three times, Read more…

Cilgerran Castle

Cilgerran is a medieval castle located above the River Teifi. It was begun by Gerald of Windsor, originally as a motte and bailey castle, around 111o as part of the Norman conquest of South Wales. Gerald of Windsor served the the Earl of Pembroke and thus the crown of England. As reward for that service, he was given a wife, Nest, who was the daughter of the King of Deheubarth. Nest had previously been a mistress of Henry I himself. One story about Nest and Gerald is that, despite her marriage, her cousin fell in love with her and attacked Cilgerran Castle where she was living. As the story goes, when her cousin arrived with his army to take her away, Nest urged Gerald to escape down the latrine shaft. This same story is also told at Carew Castle, since Read more…