Welsh Names and Places from the Books

  Aberystwyth –Ah-bare-IH-stwith Bwlch y Ddeufaen – Boolk ah THEY-vine (the ‘th’ is soft as in ‘forth’) Cadfael – CAD-vile Cadwallon – Cad-WA/SH/-on Caernarfon – (‘ae’ makes a long i sound like in ‘kite’) Kire-NAR-von Dafydd – DAH-vith Dolgellau – Doll-GE/SH/-ay Deheubarth – deh-HAY-barth Dolwyddelan – dole-with-EH-lan (the ‘th’ is soft as in ‘forth’) Gruffydd – GRIFF-ith Gwalchmai – GWALK-my (‘ai’ makes a long i sound like in ‘kite) Gwenllian – Gwen-/SH/EE-an Gwladys – Goo-LAD-iss Gwynedd – GWIN-eth Hywel – H’wel Ieuan – ieu sounds like the cheer, ‘yay’ so YAY-an Llywelyn – /sh/ew-ELL-in Maentwrog – MIGHNT-wrog Meilyr – MY-lir Owain – OH-wine Rhuddlan – RITH-lan Rhun – Rin Rhys – Reese Sion – Shawn Tudur – TIH-deer Usk – Isk

What is the significance of ‘After Cilmeri’?

Today is the 731st anniversary of the death of Llywelyn ap Gruffydd in a field at Cilmeri, Wales. It has been over 700 years since Llywelyn ap Gruffydd’s death on 11 December 1282.  J. Beverley Smith writes: “Intimations of treachery, of breach of faith, are so often conveyed darkly, and no chronicle, nor any other source, provides the unequivocal testimony which might enable us to unravel the threads in the various accounts of the tragic happening in the vicinity of Builth.  It was alleged at the time, or shortly afterwards, in the most explicit statement we have, that the prince’s decision to venture into the area was influenced by one of the sons of his old adversary, Roger Mortimer.  The Hagnaby chroinicler, an important source for the events of the day on which Llywelyn died, was quite definite:  Roger Mortimer, Read more…

Is Time Travel Possible?

I wrote a post on time travel that is being featured over at Historical Fiction ebooks. ____ We are all time travelers; we travel through time every millisecond of our lives.  It’s just that we can only move in one direction—into the future. Theoretically, time travel into the future and into the past are two distinct concepts.  Traveling into the future could happen merely by slowing down your own time, rather than popping in and out of the future like in the television show, Primeval. Unfortunately, at the moment, the kind of time travel we want to experience—into the past—isn’t possible.  Traveling in the future is only possible if we travel more quickly or more slowly than everyone else, but then we still can’t ‘get back’ to our own time: “If you want to advance through the years a little faster than the Read more…

Maps from the Books!

A reader suggested I post the maps from the books on my web page, which is a really good idea. This is the main map for the After Cilmeri Series:   For Cold My Heart. It is much the same, except I use the old name for Aber, which is Garth Celyn:   The Last Pendragon Saga: The Gareth and Gwen Medieval Mysteries. Carreg Cennen from The Bard’s Daughter is not shown, but it forms a triangle with Dinefwr and Dryslyn:

Romantic historical fiction series set in 13th Century Wales

Today, I’m happy to share with you a book review from my local paper, the East Oregonian.  I’d leave the link, but only subscribers can read it, so I thought it would be fun to share it with you in full … Book Review of the After Cilmeri Series by Renee Struthers Pendleton author Sarah Woodbury has been living for the past several years in 13th century Wales — in her mind, at least. Her five-volume “After Cilmeri” series, self-published in 2011 and 2012, follows Marged Lloyd and her children across time to medieval Wales, where they change the life of Llywelyn, the last Prince of Wales, and the history of Great Britain in a world parallel to our own. The series is classed as romantic historical fiction, but these stories aren’t the bodice-rippers that generally come to mind with Read more…

Children of Time is coming!

Here’s the cover for the print book!  I just couldn’t wait to share it. Currently, Children of Time, the fourth book in the After Cilmeri series (fifth, if you include  Daughter of Time), is in the editing/copyediting process.  I am planning on a November release date.  If you want to know the moment it arrives in stores, sign up in the side bar! November 1288. Bereft of a king or rightful heir, England hurtles towards civil war for the second time in a generation. When David, Prince of Wales, and his wife, Lili, travel to London to attend the wedding of William de Bohun and Princess Joan, they have no intention of involving themselves in local politics. But as infighting leads to murder, David and Lili find themselves at the center of a far-reaching conspiracy. Trapped between history and legend, Read more…

Aberedw Castle

In my “After Cilmeri” series, Aberedw Castle is in the hands of Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, when the Normans take it in Prince of Time.  David and Ieuan are held there until Bronwen and Lili devise their escape.  The Aberedw castle  depicted in the video appears to be the second, later one, after a search of the internet.  As it is, it is a spectacular ruin of stone masonry and far larger than many of the castles we’ve seen that have been built on mottes. One story of the end of Llywelyn ap Gruffydd has him spending his last night here.  Aberedw is on the eastern side of the Usk and 10 miles east of Cilmeri, so the other story that he stayed at Abbey Cwm Hir feels more accurate to me, but there is no definitive proof one way or Read more…

Could Time Travel Happen?

We are all time travelers of course–we travel through time every millisecond of our lives.  It’s just we only move in one direction, into the future. Conceptually, time travel into the future and into the past are two distinct concepts.  Traveling into the future could happen merely by slowing down your own time, rather than popping in and out of the future like in Primeval. “If you want to advance through the years a little faster than the next person, you’ll need to exploit space-time. Global positioning satellites pull this off every day, accruing an extra third-of-a-billionth of a second daily. Time passes faster in orbit, because satellites are farther away from the mass of the Earth. Down here on the surface, the planet’s mass drags on time and slows it down in small measures. We call this effect gravitational time dilation. According to Read more…